TUMP [EP#107 - Kill List]

This past week Douglas, Damion and I decided to take a crack at Ben Wheatley’s highly divided film Kill List. Check out the notes below:

Show Notes

What We’ve Been Watching

Andrew (00:03:30): City Lights, The Innkeepers, Marley
Douglas (00:13:50): Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, My Weekend with Marilyn, Following, Jekyll, Better off Ted, The Avengers
Damion (00:51:53): Existenz, This Means War, Demolition Man

Trailers (01:09:08): Gangster Squad, Moonrise Kingdom

Review (01:25:28): Kill List

Thanks for listening and feel free to let us know what you think either through the comments below or email us here.  You can subscribe to the podcast via our RSSThe Podcast Alley or iTunes.  It would be awesome if you would rate/review us on iTunes (we’ll read your reviews on the show)

TUMP [Bonus - Marley] [Guest: Ryan McNeil of The Matinee]

This past weekend I decided to sit down with the Hatter himself, Ryan McNeil of The Matinee, to discuss the latest documentary film by Kevin Macdonald Marley. It’s a short recording of just about 30 minutes, so take the time to give a listen and let us know what you think of the film (and the podcast) in the comments.

Thanks for listening and feel free to let us know what you think either through the comments below or email us here.  You can subscribe to the podcast via our RSSThe Podcast Alley or iTunes.  It would be awesome if you would rate/review us on iTunes (we’ll read your reviews on the show)

Movie Review: Marley (2012)

“None but ourselves can free our mind”

I’m from Jamaica. Let’s make this clear. I remember many a Sunday afternoon spent in the back seat of my father’s car being forced as a child to listen to all manners of music and endure a number of lectures, anecdotes and factoids of the history of the music. One of those things that he lectured about was Bob Marley.

To say that I walk into this movie with knowledge and an already decided perception would be an understatement. Kevin Macdonald found a way to inform me on a topic that I felt foolish enough to think I knew all there was to basically know about him. In Jamaica I live a stone’s throw away from his uptown home, now a tour guided attraction, and I had never visited it until I two years ago, so I guess that’s evidence enough that I could do with a little more education on the topic of Robert Nesta Marley.

The film takes us from the beginning, with discussions of Bob’s father and mother, and showing us his former home in Nine Miles, St. Ann, and takes us through the entire of his life through interviews and historical information from news paper clippings and video recordings to Bob’s eventual death in 1981.

It would be another five years before I would be worn when Bob Marley died, so to say “I wasn’t there” would be obvious. So when I see things like the response to his death being equal, and in some ways even greater effect on me since I feel this connection with the film being a Jamaican, to those I’ve seen in my lifetime, like Princess Diana, Christopher ‘Notorious BIG’ Wallace, or even Ayrton Senna when I saw the documentary on him last year, is just so unmistakably effective as a moment when a nation just stops to take a breath and endure emotion with a nation that usually doesn’t do such things.

I’ve been told time and time again about the moment of Bob bringing Michael Manley and Edward Seaga together in the 70s on stage during a free concert, and I understood what the implications of that moment meant knowing the context, but I don’t think I’ve ever really felt it until I was able to see the event happen in front of me through the footage shown in the film. The moment where I can only felt the hope that was being disseminated across the country that’s been riddled with political violence, and still is, seeing these two men on the opposing sides in so many walks of life holding hands with Bob saying the words “love, prosperity, be with us all”. You just hoped that everyone who’s on those front lines doing the killing would realize that life doesn’t have to be like that.

This is a film filled with moments that all bring hope and joy into your life. It brings you back to that time with Marley asking you to pass through his life as best as we all remember it. From discussions about him as a father with his son David “Ziggy” Marley, a husband with his wife Rita Marley, a colleague with Bunny Wailer and more and it is a wonderful passage.

Rating: 9.0/10

What I’ve Been Watching: Apr 22nd – Apr 28th

Another week has ended which means it’s time for me to recant my week in film. I would be lying if the week didn’t come with it’s ups and downs. I ate shark for the first time, and that was weird – it’s not as awesome as it sounds – but it’s all evened out by me getting to see MARLEY and it surpassing any expectation I could’ve had for it.

So check out my tally below.

FIRST TIME VIEWS

HAYWIRE (2012) - I can see why so many people didn’t love it… but it’s pretty good, not my fav Soderbergh though.
GOD BLESS AMERICA (2012) – thank you Bobcat
PARIAH (2011) - kind of awesome coming of age drama… not sure I have anything bad to say about it.
PERFECT SENSE (2011) – a romance marred by having one of the dumbest apocalpses in film
RAMPART (2011) – just disappointing all around
MARLEY (2012) – great direction added to a film about a great man

REWATCHED

COMING TO AMERICA (1988)“Give a hand to my band, Sexual Chocolate.”
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (2003)“The only rules that really matter are these: what a man can do and what a man can’t do”
HULK (2003)“Bad science”

THE COUNT

67 First time watches (17 from 2012); 39 Rewatches; 106 Total Films

SONG OF THE WEEK

What did you see this week