TIFF Day 3,4 & 5: Lots of Movies

So the last three days have been a flurry of great, mediocre and lazy films. But all things that make me happy I made the trip. Some of these reviews are yet to be posted, so please come back later in the day and you'll see more content in this post:

A Liar’s Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python’s Graham Chapman (dir. Bill Jones, Jeff Simpson, Ben Timlett)

"A Liar’s Autobiography almost strikes me as a comedian experimenting with a routine, in which he hasn’t quite worked out all the kinks, and which someone thought would be great to throw up on the screen as the finished product." Read the full review on FSR

Like Someone in Love (dir. Abbas Kiarostami)

"What this film, like Certified Copy, does so well is in its ability to hold your attention for long periods of time while the setting and camera barely change. It’s engaging even when all that’s occurring on screen is interesting dialogue between two (and in some cases three) characters." Read the full review on FSR.

Seven Psychopaths (dir. Martin McDonagh)

"Seven Psychopaths also plays a lot with film conventions. During the runtime of the film, as Marty is discovering his psychopath characters, there is a series of shorter films embedded within the movie." Read the full review on FSR.

The Place Beyond the Pines (dir. Derek Cianfrance)

"To its merit, the film constantly utilizes this side-by-side effect to show how divided the world can be. It’s a bit like in The Departed when Jack Nicholson’s Frank Costello says “they would say we can become cops or criminals…when you’re facing a loaded gun, what’s the difference?”. Place Beyond the Pines actually tries to take a deeper look at that loaded gun in order to decipher a real difference." Read the full review on FSR.

The Sessions (dir. Ben Lewin)

"The Sessions delves into the same territory as films like Friends With Benefits. The idea that a relationship, professional or otherwise, where sex and intimacy are the primary basis won’t lead to emotional entanglement continues to baffle screenwriters as they pretend that the film won’t end in tears for both people involved. This film, while still running into those moments, handles them in ways that feel a lot more real than previous films that are only half as funny." Read the full review on FSR.